​Vintage Chevy Auction: Ray Lambrecht Auction To Sell Chevy Collection

Author: Rob AdamsBy:
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August 20, 2013

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A vintage Chevy is hard to find, but now everyone will get a chance to bid on several cars at a new auction. Ray Lambrecht began collecting his nest egg, which will be an auction of some 500 cars with low miles.

Lambrecht ran a small-town dealership in northeast Nebraska with a big and valuable secret. He held on to new cars and trucks that didn’t sell right away. In fact, he stashed them in warehouses, at his farm and in other spots around the town he worked in for 50 years.

Now, his collection has about 500 vintage cars and trucks that will go on the auction block. Next month, visitors from at least a dozen countries and throughout the U.S. will converge on the 1,800-resident town, or bid online.

The two-day auction will feature mostly unsold Chevrolets that have sat untouched for decades. They’ll go on the block in as-is condition. About 50 have fewer than 20 miles on the odometer, and some are so rare that no one has established a price. The most valuable, including a rare Chevy Cameo pickup, could fetch six-figure bids from collectors who view them as works of art to display or as restoration projects.

“To find this many new, old vehicles is unheard of,” said Yvette VanDerBrink, the auctioneer coordinating the event. “It’s like a white buffalo.”

Preparations for the auction began in June, and VanDerBrink has taken calls from as far as Iceland, Singapore and Brazil. The two least-driven cars, a 1959 Bel Air and a 1960 Corvair Monza, each have one mile on their odometer. The oldest vehicle with fewer than 20 miles dates to 1958; the newest is a 1980 Monza with nine miles.

On a recent afternoon, VanDerBrink stepped over hubcaps and engine parts in the cramped, dust-caked dealership that closed in 1996. In the corner sat the sky-blue 1958 Cameo with 1.3 miles, a cracked windshield and a dented roof — but its interior is unblemished.

Nearby, a red-and-white 1963 Impala waits with 11.4 miles logged. Manufacturer’s plastic covers the seats. The car was never titled. A yellowed, typewritten window sticker touts its original price: $3,254.70.

Ray Lambrecht opened the downtown dealership with his uncle in 1946, on the corner of Main Street and Nebraska Highway 13. Live elephants meandered out front that day, with Chevrolet banners across their backs.