BPA Levels In Canned Soup Soar 1,200%

BPA Levels Canned Soup – BPA (bisphenol A) levels can increase with regular consumption of canned soup, according to a new study. It has been associated with a number of harmful health effects. Urine samples showed that daily consumption was associated with a more than 1,200 percent increase, compared to eating fresh soup.

The study authors added that the increase may be temporary and more research is needed.

It is an endocrine-disrupting chemical used in the lining of metal food and beverage cans, in polycarbonate bottles, and dentistry composites and sealants. It’s been linked with diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease in humans and has been shown to interfere with reproductive development in animals.

The Harvard School of Public Health study included 75 volunteers in two groups. One group ate a 12-ounce serving of vegetarian canned soup each day for five days and the other group ate the same amount of fresh vegetarian soup daily for five days. The groups then switched the type of soup they ate for another five days.

Urine samples showed that daily consumption of canned soup was associated with a more than 1,200 percent increase in BPA, compared to eating fresh soup.

The study appears online Nov. 22 and in the Nov. 23 print issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“We’ve known for a while that drinking beverages that have been stored in certain hard plastics can increase the amount of BPA in your body. This study suggests that canned foods may be an even greater concern, especially given their wide use,” lead author Jenny Carwile, a doctoral student in Harvard School of Public Health’s epidemiology department, said in a university news release.