​Mad Cow Disease Found In US Dairy Cow

Author: Kara GilmourBy:
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April 25, 2012

A dead dairy cow in California was discovered to have the mad-cow decease known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), which is only the fourth case in the U.S. since being discovered in Europe in 1986 and 1st since 2006.

Tom Vilsack, of the U.S. Department of Agriculture indicated that there was no threat to humans, that can contract a degenerative brain disease if they ingest deceased meat from a sick cow. The sick cow had been sent to a rendering plant that processes sick and deceased animals for inedible products such as soap, and glue.

The USDA says that the cow was one of 40,000 that it tests yearly for BSE and the carcass that has been quarantined will be destroyed.

“The beef and dairy in the American food supply is safe and USDA remains confident in the health of U.S. cattle,” USDA Secretary, Vilsack said in a statement. “The systems and safeguards in place to protect animal and human health worked as planned to identify this case quickly, and will ensure that it presents no risk to the food supply or to human health.”

Bruce Akey, director of the New York State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Cornell University, tells the AP that these cases are bound to happen every so often no matter what. He says the recent discover was “just a random mutation that can happen every once in a great while in an animal.”

He added, “Random mutations go on in nature all the time.”

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