Reconditioning Food For Profit Prompts FDA Concerns

Reconditioning Food – Companies are reconditioning what we eat in an effort to promote food for a profit. This was recently brought to the public’s attention. A company that manufactured apple products had a batch of moldy applesauce.

Instead of tossing it, they mixed it with other products and shipped it out for sale. The FDA was not amused.

Food safety rules are supposed to insure public safety when consuming products purchased in supermarkets and other sales locations. However, the rules might surprise you.

This reconditioning was recently brought to the public’s attention. A company that manufactured apple products had a batch of moldy applesauce. Instead of tossing it, they mixed it with other products and shipped it out for sale. The FDA was not amused.

The problem of product contamination is huge. In fact, it’s so huge that the FDA actually has rules about how much of which contaminant can be in various products. Did you find a rodent hair in your pasta? The FDA allows 4.5 of them per eight ounce package of pasta. Do you see maggots in your canned mushrooms? Twenty or more are allowed per 3.5 ounce can of mushrooms.

The problem with some of this is that you can’t get around it. If you have a grain product, be prepared for weevils. They can’t be avoided. Even a certain amount of mold can be acceptable, as long as it is below a certain level.

Not all reconditioning is a problem. If a product is mislabeled, then all the company has to do is change the label. If it contains a product not listed on the ingredients, the same thing can occur.

When it comes to the moldy applesauce, the FDA’s problem was that the solution the company came up with doesn’t always work. Mold tends to grow. While the heat treatment given to the food probably killed most of one type of mold, it may not have killed another type.