​Human Skulls Donated To Goodwill, Authorities Seek Help

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July 11, 2021

Human Skulls Donated - Employees discovered 3 human skulls that were donated at Goodwill thrift store in Bellevue, Washington. The items identified by the King County Medical Examiner’s Office, concerned the staff enough to call authorities. Police are asking the public for help on where the remains came from.

The human skulls are adult specimens that were clearly used in a medical clinic. However, a third one was donated, which turned out to be very old an appears to be of a Native American child. That last bit is particularly important because “The Native American skull must be repatriated to its tribe of origin,” the Examiner’s Office notes.

The office is asking that the person who donated the skulls come forward, without penalty, to provide more details on the origin of the skull.

“There is no information about who donated the skulls,” the Atlanta Journal Constitution reports. “The office is asking that the person who donated the skulls come forward, without penalty, to provide more details on the origin of the skull,” the site said about the skulls. Authorities want to know how they came to be in the donor’s possession.

Anyone with information about the three donated skulls, or who has other human skeletal remains, should contact the King County Medical Examiner’s Office at 206-731-3232, ext. 1.

The human skulls prove that people will apparently donate almost anything to Goodwill. The unusual items were dropped off to the thrift store at 14515 NE 20th St. in late June. The Medical Examiner’s Office advises that anyone who is given or inherits clinical or archaeological remains can turn them in to the medical examiner.

“If you inadvertently discover human remains, such as buried or in a public place, you must notify law enforcement,” the Medical Examiner’s office said.

While the human skulls is being investigated, state law dictates that the Native American one will be returned to its tribe of origin, but more information is needed to identify the correct tribe.