​Obama And Romney To Meet For Lunch To Discuss Government Ideas

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November 29, 2012
Also: Mitt Romney, Obama And Romney To Meet For Lunch, President Obama, White House

President Barack Obama will meet with Mitt Romney for a White House lunch to talk with his opponent about some of the great ideas he had with stream lining government.

On Wednesday, The White House announced the lunch date. “Governor Romney will have a private lunch at the White House with President Obama in the private dining room.”

As the “fiscal cliff” approaches, that some financial experts predict could set the country back into a recession, the lunch could be a tool to help Obama sooth over issues with Republican congressional leaders, showing him to be bipartisan. Meanwhile, the lunch could benefit Romney by helping to repair his stature after losing the election.

The meeting will be sandwiched between a series of events this week in which Obama is making his case to Americans to raise taxes on wealthy Americans while extending tax cuts for the middle class – an approach that his former Republican rival strongly opposed during the campaign.

Obama’s Democrats and their Republican foes remain deadlocked over dramatic, year-end tax increases and spending cuts known as the fiscal cliff.

President Obama is hoping to accomplish something with Romney that he was unable to with his 2008 opponent John McCain after winning the election. After the 2008 election, McCain had congratulated the president on his historic victory and promised to work together with him to solve the country’s financial issues and find new energy sources. However, the relationship between the two quickly soured and they never worked together.

“But cooperation could happen,” says Scott Farris, author of “Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation.” “Romney is not exactly a dogmatic Republican and does not have deep ties to party activists that might inhibit him from crossing over the line.”

Further, Farris adds, Romney may have something to gain from working directly with the Obama administration. Unlike McCain, who returned to his Senate seat after his failed bid, Romney now holds no political office and may be looking for a new way to make his voice heard in government.