​Texas Secession Petition To Secede Challenges Obama

Author: Rob AdamsBy:
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November 29, 2012
Also: Lone Star, Secede, Texas, Texas Secession Fever, United States, White House

The Texas secession petition has collected 25,000 signatures needed to advocate for the Lone Star state to secede from the United States of America, and to become it’s own country.

It is the first such movement for the state since it joined the union in 1845. The basis is the disagreement with the federal government over its fiscal and security policies, including TSA searches at airports.

Many people look at this movement and wonder, with the difficulty of fiscally managing a nation and its diverse factions of peoples, why anybody would want to set up their own country?

However, the U.S.-Mexico border region, as important as it is economically, is often ignored by White House,, and Mexico City. At a more local level, the border region is often ignored by the powers that be in the state capitals of border states. The El Paso and Southern New Mexico region can be used as an example.

In 1850, El Pasoans opted to become part of Texas, rejecting its historical connection to New Mexico. Referred to as “El Paso del Norte,” the Pass to the North, in colonial times, this city was a major gateway to New Mexico on the Camino Real, the royal highway that stretched from Mexico City to Santa Fe. The pass to the north in this case was the pass to Santa Fe.

The U.S. and Mexico come together physically via the nearly 2,000-mile border between the nations. The region plays a natural role of industrial production and the logistics required to send products to target markets on either side of the border. The logistical superiority of two economic powerhouses being located next to each other, coupled with the economical labor force, make the border region an important place where companies can achieve the advantages necessary to compete in the global market.

The border’s popularity as an industrial and logistical base will continue in the future as industrial and supply chains tighten.

With the global economic crises continuing, wouldn’t it be in the best interest for the people of Texas to stay linked with the United States?

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