Earliest Human Remains Found In Arctic

Earliest Human Remains Arctic. Earliest human remains discovered in the Arctic of North America at a burial site. It’s a story that is quickly unfolding, that happened 11,500 years ago, as a family laid a 3-year-old child to rest in their home in what is now Alaska.

The discovery of that burial is shedding new light on the life and times of the early settlers who crossed from Asia to the New World, researchers report in Friday’s edition of the journal Science.

The bones represent the earliest human remains discovered in the Arctic of North America, a “pretty significant find,” said Ben A. Potter of the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

While ancient Alaskan residents were known to hunt large game, the newly discovered site shows they also foraged for fish, birds and small mammals, he explained. “Here we know there were young children and females. So, this is a whole piece of the settlement system that we had virtually no record of.”

The site of the discovery, Upper Sun River, is in the forest of the Tanana lowlands in central Alaska, Potter and his colleagues report.

Potter said the find, which included evidence of what appeared to be a seasonal house and the cremated remains of the child, “is truly spectacular in all senses of the word.”

“Before this find, we knew people were hunting large game like bison or elk with sophisticated weapons, but most of sites we had to study were hunting camps,” Potter said.