​Lenny Dykstra Gets Sentenced In Bankruptcy Fraud Case

Author: Michael StevensBy:
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December 5, 2012
Also: Bankruptcy Fraud, Lenny Dykstra, MLB, New York Mets

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Lenny Dykstra, former MLB player, was sentenced to 6 1/2 months in prison on Monday for his charge of bankruptcy fraud.

Dykstra had been placed under house arrest in May of last year after being indicted on bankruptcy fraud, but was later placed in prison on a three-year sentence stemming from an auto theft.

Authorities had accused the former Met and Philly of hiding and selling memorabilia from his playing days after the bankruptcy court had already recorded them as part of his assets.

After Dykstra plead guilty earlier this year to bankruptcy fraud, concealment of assets and money-laundering, prosecutors were seeking an additional 2 1/2 year sentence. But the judge went lightly on Dykstra, sympathizing for him over is other legal troubles.

However, along with the 6 1/2 months, he will have to serve for the bankruptcy fraud, he will need to pay a fine and restitution of $200,000 and serve 500 hours of community service.

In July 2009, Dykstra, whose net worth was estimated at $58 million in 2008, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, listing less than $50,000 in assets against $10 million to $50 million in liabilities. Dykstra claimed to be a victim of mortgage fraud and lost a house purchased for $17.5 million from Wayne Gretzky to foreclosure. After the filing, Dykstra hid, sold or destroyed at least $200,000 worth of items without permission of a bankruptcy trustee, prosecutors said.

Over the past several years Dykstra has had several legal issues stemming from failed business ventures to drug and alchol issues, including allegations of steroid use during his playing days. An extensive article about an ESPN.com investigation in April 2009 went into greater detail, asserting that Dykstra has been the subject of at least two dozen legal actions since 2007.

At his Monday sentencing, Dykstra apologized for his actions and said, “I don’t think I’m a bad person, I made some bad decisions.”