​Airports Returning To Normal Following Winter Storm Nemo

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February 11, 2013
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Airports in the Northeast are returning to normal operations following a massive snowstorm that led to thousands of flight delays and cancellations in New York and Boston.

Airports Returning To Normal

The last airport to open was Boston’s Logan, but it was still experiencing delays as of Sunday, and officials urged passengers to check with their airline.

On Monday, airlines said they were operating close-to-normal schedules.

However, there were about 380 flights canceled on Sunday, which is a very busy day for travelers. Only 12 are expected for Monday.

In all roughly 5,650 flights have been canceled since Friday, when several airports shut down in anticipation of the storm. Friday saw the most cancellations with Saturday a close second. Airlines waived ticket-change fees for passengers in the affected areas.

Air carriers try to get ahead of big storms by canceling flights in advance. They want to avoid having crews and planes stuck in one area of the country. They also face fines for leaving passengers stuck on a plane for more than three hours, under a rule that went into effect in 2010.

Delta Air Lines said that as of Sunday morning, its flights were back to normal. It canceled about 1,200 flights due to the storm.

Jetblue said flights are back to regular schedules in New York and will be in Boston by Monday.

The “Winter Storm Nemo” left the New York City-metro area blanketed in snow. Though spared the worst of Nemo, New York City experienced significant snowfall totals – with 11.4 inches measured in Central Park.

Outside New York City, an estimated 100 vehicles were disabled or abandoned along the Long Island Expressway early Saturday.

“The plows can’t plow because of the disabled motorists…It’s a very daunting task,” Lt. Daniel Meyers, a spokesperson for the Suffolk County Highway Patrol said.

Myers said he believed no motorists were left inside the stranded cars.