$254 Million Powerball Winners From State Lottery

$254 Million Powerball Winners – Three men who work at Belpointe Asset Management are winners of the $254 million Connecticut Lottery. Tim Davidson, Brandon Lacoff and Greg Skidmore all have matching Powerball numbers. “Obviously, everybody is extremely excited,” said Jason Kurland, the group’s attorney.

“These numbers are huge. This is going to benefit many people,” Kurland added.

Skidmore, Lacoff and Davidson came forward with the trustees of The Putnam Avenue Family Trust, which they formed to help manage the money after Davidson bought the winning ticket at a Stamford gas station.

Kurland said the men contacted him immediately after the Nov. 2 drawing and came forward after making plans for the money. He said the trust will take the after-tax lump sum of $103,586,824.51 cash and a significant amount will go to charity.

Davidson bought a single Quick Pick ticket at the Shippan Point BP gas station in Stamford. A computer chose the random numbers of 12-14-34-39-46, Powerball 36.

The jackpot was the largest ever won in Connecticut and the 12th biggest in Powerball history. The largest previous lottery jackpot in Connecticut was $59.5 million in June 2005.

The three men work at Belpointe, an asset management firm in Greenwich that provides investment advice, much of it to wealthy individuals, according to the Securities and Exchange Commission. The company manages $82 million, according to the SEC.

Skidmore, the company’s president and chief investment officer, is a former member of the U.S. sailing team who was once an Olympic hopeful, according to the company’s website.

Davidson’s online biography says he grew up in Switzerland, France and the United Kingston and started his career in financial markets in 1979 with a French bank. He has worked in New York, Paris and London and is a senior portfolio manager and wealth adviser.

Lacoff, the site says, co-founded Belpointe and owns others businesses and properties on Connecticut’s shoreline, including companies that manage the assets of individuals and institutions.

They sat stoically at a conference table sipping bottled water as Kurland answered questions, declining to describe the trio’s relationship with one another, how they came to purchase a $1 ticket together or what they would do with the money, except to say that Connecticut charities would benefit from the windfall.