Jaycee Dugard Sues Federal Government For Phillip Garrido Kidnapping

Jaycee Dugard sues Federal Government for not monitoring the convicted sex offender who kidnapped her. Phillip Garrido took Dugard in 1991 when she was 11 and held her captive for 18 years. Garrido also fathered her two daughters before she was rescued in 2009.

Garrido was sentenced to 50 years in a federal prison in 1977 for the earlier kidnapping and forcible rape of another, different California woman, according to Reuters. After serving only 11 years he was released on parole and was supposed to be placed under supervision of state and federal agents.

The suit filed by Dugard’s attorneys in U.S. District Court in San Francisco Thursday, said the mistakes made by federal parole officers in the handling of Phillip Garrido’s case are as “outrageous and inexcusable as they are numerous.”

Court records also state that Dugard was abducted by him because the government officials failed to do their job.

The complaint lists a number of incidences of alleged misconduct by federal authorities from failing to get Garrido proper mental health treatment to not providing adequate information to state authorities when he was transferred to their charge.

It says Garrido tested positive for drugs and alcohol while on parole, a violation for a sex offender, but was never punished. It also says authorities ignored reports of sexual misconduct, including a complaint that Garrido showed up at his former victim’s work and made an “alarming” comment to her. After the incident, Garrido’s counselor recommended electronic monitoring, but his parole officer disregarded it as “too much of a hassle,” according to the complaint.

“We believe that the years of abuse experienced by Ms. Dugard are a direct result of the U.S. Parole Commission’s colossal blunders in the supervision of Mr. Garrido,” attorney Dale Kinsella told the news service.

Dugard has already received a $20 million-dollar settlement from the state of California for it failure to monitor Garrido. The federal government took over his supervision in 1999.