Search

Hubble Unveils Third Red Spot on Planet Jupiter

The Hubble space telescope and the Keck telescope provided new images that might support the idea that climate change is under way on planet Jupiter.

A team of international scientists said the new spot on Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system, arose from a white oval-shaped storm and has changed to a red color clearly showing that the storm is swirling high into the Jovian atmosphere.

The images, taken by the orbiting Hubble space telescope and the Keck telescope in Hawaii, may support the idea that climate change is under way on Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system.

Amateur planet-gazer Christopher Go of Cebu in the Philippines helped locate the new development.

While the Great Red Spot has been visible for as long as 350 years, Red Spot Jr. had only been around since 2006. The team at the University of California Berkeley said all three spots represent storms and must be towering above the methane in Jupiter’s atmosphere.

“If this spot and the Great Red Spot continue on their courses, they will encounter each other in August, and the small oval will either be absorbed or repelled from the Great Red Spot,” Michael Wong of Berkeley, who worked on the study, said in a statement.

The Great Red Spot has raged for 200 to 350 years. Red Spot, Jr., has continued since spring of 2006.