Shackleton Scotch Found In Antarctic Hut

Researchers have no plans to drink the Shackleton scotch as it will be preserved for its historical significance.

Shackleton Scotch was found in the Antarctic hut. Researchers found 11 carefully wrapped bottles of Mackinlay’s Scotch whisky inside. The collection will be shipped to the Scotch Canterbury Museum in Christchurch on New Zealand’s South Island.

Researchers found 11 carefully wrapped bottles of Mackinlay’s Scotch whisky inside an Antarctic hut of renowned explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton. The crate, which contained 11 bottles of “Mackinlay’s Rare Old Highland Malt Whisky,” was discovered along with four others in Shackleton’s hut at Cape Royds on Ross Island in 2006.

The famed traveler brought the liquor with him during his 1907 Nimrod expedition, and the cases were ultimately discovered encased in ice under the floorboards of the hut. The liquor inside, however, had not frozen, despite temperatures of -22 Fahrenheit. The Scotch, which was defrosted at the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch on New Zealand’s South Island, will eventually be returned to Shackleton’s hut and preserved “for its historic significance.”

Samples will be sent to Whyte and Mackay, the distiller who took over Mackinlay’s operations so that they can attempt to duplicate the brew. The whiskey was first discovered, along with a couple of crates of brandy, back in 2006 by a team that included Al Fastier of the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust. However, it could not be extracted until January of this year because it was too deeply encased in ice.