MC Hammer Connects WireDoo For Alternative Search

MC Hammer Announces WireDoo At Web 2.0 Summit

WMC Hammer is promoting a new “deep relational” search engine called WireDoo. The singer made the announcement at the Web 2.0 Summit. MC was present to make his announcement at invitation-only event hosted each year in San Francisco, California, featuring discussions involving the Internet.

“Why create another search engine?” he asked the confused Web 2.0 audience rhetorically. “Well, what if Sergei and Larry had not tried?,” he said, referring to the fact that Google founder Sergei Brin was backstage during his talk. The man does have a point. His offering, WireDoo, which is ironically un-Googleable, apparently has the motto of, “Search once and see what’s related.”

Wiredoo MC Hammer Further Explained

With this online product, which again, can’t be found anywhere, users will be able to do relational terms. Type in AAPL and you’ll get a list of mutual funds invested in AAPL, type in a school name, and you’ll get the truancy rate.

He also gave a demonstration of the new engine and walked through a slide deck with a real estate database for houses near Horace Mann School in New York. Results in the SlideDoo search include houses for sale, as well as statistics about the school such as truancy rate, and other relevant information about the neighborhood.

The singer is a businessman and does have quite a bit of experience with the web and internet, in the late 1990s into the early 2000s, along with a new clothing line called “J Slick,” he began creating and working on an interactive online portal.

MC Hammer Ready To Recreate What People Find

The product really is a competitive attempt to recreate what people try to find, “You could always make things better, create the next version.” He ended the talk saying, “No one’s playing for singles in the Valley anymore,” most likely referring to a baseball term of hitting a home run.

As a result of his previous success, Hammer has now become somewhat of a popular web mogul and activist, currently involved in several Internet projects, such as the TechCrunch40 conferences and DanceJam, In early 2008, he launched a project as co-founder and chief strategy officer of Menlo Park-based (Silicon Valley) DanceJam.com. This exclusive community site is only dedicated to dancing video competitions, techniques and styles which he and others judge or rate.