Betelgeuse Supernova Creates Two Suns In 2012

By: Susan Harris
Staff Writer
Published: Jan 22, 2021

Betelgeuse Supernova, Two Suns In 2012 -- Fact or fiction? Betelgeuse Supernova may cause two suns in 2012 for Earth, at least temporarily. Dr. Brad Carter, Senior Lecturer of Physics at the University of Southern Queensland, outlined the scenario.

One of the night sky's brightest stars, known as Betelgeuse, is losing mass because it's collapsing. It could run out of fuel and go super-nova at any time.

When that happens, for at least a few weeks, we'd see a second sun, Carter says. There may also be no night during that timeframe. The Star Wars-esque scenario could happen by 2012, Carter says… or it could take longer. The explosion could also cause a neutron star or result in the formation of a black hole 1300 light years from Earth.

But doomsday sayers should be careful about speculation on this one. If the star does go super-nova, Earth will be showered with harmless particles, according to Carter.

"They will flood through the Earth and bizarrely enough, even though the supernova we see visually will light up the night sky, 99 per cent of the energy in the supernova is released in these particles that will come through our bodies and through the Earth with absolutely no harm whatsoever," he said.

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